The Gender Game by Bella Forrest

The Gender Game by Bella ForrestThe Gender Game (The Gender Game #1) by Bella Forrest
Format: Audio
Narrator: Rebecca Soler, Zachary Webber
Series: The Gender Game
on October 28th, 2016
Genres: YA, Dystopian
Source: Audible
Buy on Amazon
Goodreads
four-stars

PREPARE TO ENTER AN ALL-NEW WORLD...

A toxic river divides nineteen-year-old Violet Bates's world by gender. Women rule the East. Men rule the West. Welcome to the lands of Matrus and Patrus...

Ever since the death of her mother, Violet's life has been shadowed by bad luck. Already a prisoner to her own nation, now after two unfortunate incidents resulting in womanslaughter, she has been sentenced to death.

But one decision could save her life.

One decision to enter the kingdom of Patrus, where men rule and women submit.

Everything about the patriarchy defies Violet's identity, but she must sacrifice everything if she wishes to survive the forbidden kingdom... including forbidden love.

How much of yourself could you give up to keep yourself alive?

“Chanda Reads Books” is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. This is at no cost to the readers of this blog.


Review of the story:

I have been meaning to read a Bella Forrest novel for a while. I know she has the Shade of Vampire series, but I’m really picky with vampire stories so I never checked them out. To be honest, I didn’t go into The Gender Game with high expectations because I know Ms. Forrest pumps out books like crazy (like 4-5 books a year). I have found with other independent authors who crank out books that quickly that sometimes editing is sub-par, but as long as the story is good I generally don’t mind. With that being said, the book was better than I expected. Yes, there were a few issues: the letter at the end (don’t want to spoil it) felt too convenient and disingenuous to the story, some characterization for a major character in the book was a little underdone, and the world building left me wanting more. However, The Gender Game also had some great elements to it: 

-Strong and likable female lead character
-Unique dystopian world in a genre overflowing with unoriginal ideas
-Lots of action
-Quickly paced
-Just enough romance to tease you, but not to overpower the narrative
-Also, The author clearly did research on MMA fighting and the fighting scenes never felt forced
 

Overall, I enjoyed the book and will be continuing the series. I will likely not do reviews on this blog for the following books, but I will review on Goodreads, as I find doing reviews here for sequels not very helpful.  

Review of the audio:

I’ve been a fan of Rebecca Soler since listening to the Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer. I thought it might be difficult to separate Cinder’s voice from Violet’s, but I found it relatively easy as I was drawn into the story. Rebecca Soler remains to be one of my favorite narrators, as she brings life to characters through her superb voice acting abilities. Zachary Webber only did a small portion at the end of the book, but I have also listened to him before and enjoy his voice. 


 

The Gender Game is part of the Kindle Unlimited program, which I highly recommend if you’re not already a member. It’s only $10 a month and soooo worth it! There are even a lot of books with audio included! Click below for more details about the Kindle Unlimited program, if you’re interested.


four-stars

Top 10 Tuesday (12)

“Top Ten Tuesday” is hosted by The Broke and the Bookish.
Every week they pick a topic for us to do a top 10 list for and this week’s topic is…

I took this as books that just remind me of fall, whether because of the theme or just the nostalgic feeling I get when I think of the book. Brace yourselves for lots of books about witch trials, as they have always fascinated me! Some of the books I’m sure almost everyone will be familiar with, but for the ones maybe not as familiar I included a synopsis underneath.

As always, click on the book cover for a link to purchase the book. 

“Chanda Reads Books” is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. This is at no cost to the readers of this blog.


.1.

Title: A Storm of Witchcraft
Author: Emerson W. Baker
Genre:  Non-Fiction, History

Beginning in January 1692, Salem Village in colonial Massachusetts witnessed the largest and most lethal outbreak of witchcraft in early America. Villagers–mainly young women–suffered from unseen torments that caused them to writhe, shriek, and contort their bodies, complaining of pins stuck into their flesh and of being haunted by specters. Believing that they suffered from assaults by an invisible spirit, the community began a hunt to track down those responsible for the demonic work. The resulting Salem Witch Trials, culminating in the execution of 19 villagers, persists as one of the most mysterious and fascinating events in American history.

Historians have speculated on a web of possible causes for the witchcraft that stated in Salem and spread across the region-religious crisis, ergot poisoning, an encephalitis outbreak, frontier war hysteria–but most agree that there was no single factor. Rather, as Emerson Baker illustrates in this seminal new work, Salem was “a perfect storm”: a unique convergence of conditions and events that produced something extraordinary throughout New England in 1692 and the following years, and which has haunted us ever since.

Baker shows how a range of factors in the Bay colony in the 1690s, including a new charter and government, a lethal frontier war, and religious and political conflicts, set the stage for the dramatic events in Salem. Engaging a range of perspectives, he looks at the key players in the outbreak–the accused witches and the people they allegedly bewitched, as well as the judges and government officials who prosecuted them–and wrestles with questions about why the Salem tragedy unfolded as it did, and why it has become an enduring legacy.

Salem in 1692 was a critical moment for the fading Puritan government of Massachusetts Bay, whose attempts to suppress the story of the trials and erase them from memory only fueled the popular imagination. Baker argues that the trials marked a turning point in colonial history from Puritan communalism to Yankee independence, from faith in collective conscience to skepticism toward moral governance. A brilliantly told tale, A Storm of Witchcraft also puts Salem’s storm into its broader context as a part of the ongoing narrative of American history and the history of the Atlantic World.


.2.

Title: How to Hang a Witch
Author: Adriana Mather
Genre:  YA, Fiction, Fantasy

Salem, Massachusetts, is the site of the infamous witch trials and the new home of Samantha Mather. Recently transplanted from New York City, Sam and her stepmother are not exactly welcomed with open arms. Sam is the descendant of Cotton Mather, one of the men responsible for those trials—and almost immediately, she becomes the enemy of a group of girls who call themselves the Descendants. And guess who their ancestors were?

If dealing with that weren’t enough, Sam also comes face to face with a real, live (well, technically dead) ghost. A handsome, angry ghost who wants Sam to stop touching his stuff. But soon Sam discovers she is at the center of a centuries-old curse affecting anyone with ties to the trials. Sam must come to terms with the ghost and find a way to work with the Descendants to stop a deadly cycle that has been going on since the first accused witch was hanged. If any town should have learned its lesson, it’s Salem. But history may be about to repeat itself.


.3.

Title: The Salem Witch Trials: A Day-by-Day Chronicle of a Community Under Siege
Author:Marilynne K. Roach
Genre: Non-Fiction, History

Based on over twenty years of original archival research, this history unfolds a nearly day-by-day narrative of the Salem Witch Trials as the citizens of Salem experienced the outbreak of hysteria.


.4.

Title: ‘Salem’s Lot
Author:  Stephen King
Genre: Horror, Mystery, Suspense

Ben Mears has returned to Jerusalem’s Lot in hopes that exploring the history of the Marsten House, an old mansion long the subject of rumor and speculation, will help him cast out his personal devils and provide inspiration for his new book. But when two young boys venture into the woods, and only one returns alive, Mears begins to realize that something sinister is at work—in fact, his hometown is under siege from forces of darkness far beyond his imagination. And only he, with a small group of allies, can hope to contain the evil that is growing within the borders of this small New England town.


.5.

Title: Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone: Illustrated
Author:  J.K Rowling (Illustrations by Jim Kay)
Genre:   Fantasy

This is one of the times where the book just makes me nostalgic for fall. I want to be in the Great Hall having a feast  with the rest of the Hogwarts students. 


.6.

Title: Whispers in Autumn (The Last Year Book 1)
Author:  Trisha Leigh
Genre:   YA, Dystopian, Romance, Sci-Fi

In 2015, a race of alien Others conquered Earth. They enslaved humanity not by force, but through an aggressive mind control that turned people into contented, unquestioning robots.

Except sixteen-year-old Althea isn’t content at all, and she doesn’t need the mysterious note inside her locket to tell her she’s Something Else. It also warns her to trust no one, so she hides the pieces that make her different, even though it means being alone.

The autumn she meets Lucas, everything changes.

Althea and Lucas are immune to the alien mind control, and together they search for the reason why. What they uncover is a stunning truth the Others never anticipated, one with the potential to free the brainwashed human race.

It’s not who they are that makes them special, but what.

And what they are is a threat. One the Others are determined to eliminate for good.


.7.

Title: Dracula
Author: Bram Stoker
Genre:  Horror, Fantasy

A junior solicitor travels to Transylvania to meet with an important client, the mysterious Count Dracula. Ignoring the dire warnings of local townsfolk, he allows himself to be seduced by the count’s courtly manners and erudite charm. Too late, the solicitor realizes that he is a prisoner of Castle Dracula, his guards a trio of voluptuous young women with sharp white teeth and a taste for blood.

Soon thereafter, the solicitor’s fiancée, Mina, visits a friend on the English coast. The town is full of speculation over a Russian ship run aground nearby, its crew missing, the dead body of its captain, crucifix in hand, lashed to the wheel. A giant dog was seen leaping from the deck before disappearing into the countryside. The ship’s cargo: fifty boxes of Transylvanian dirt. As the beautiful Mina will soon learn, Count Dracula has arrived.


.8.

Title: The Legend of Sleepy Hollow
Author: Washington Irving
Genre:   Fantasy, Horror

North of New York City lies Sleepy Hollow, a secluded glen rumored to be the home of countless phantoms and specters. Chief among them is the Headless Horseman, the ghost of a Hessian soldier whose head was removed by a stray cannonball in the Revolutionary War. He rides across the glen each night and disappears in a flash of fire and brimstone at the bridge near the Old Dutch Burial Ground.

Ichabod Crane, a superstitious schoolteacher who recently arrived from Connecticut, wants to marry Katrina Van Tassel, the only child of a wealthy farmer. The locals spook him with story after story about the ghosts of Sleepy Hollow. Late one night, he spies a menacing figure at a crossroads. Worse yet, the man’s head appears to be on his saddle. Crane has only one chance to survive—he has to make it to the bridge before it’s too late.

I still think of the Sleepy Hollow animated movie and the above Ichabod every time I hear the story 😂


.9.

Title: Edgar Allen Poe The Complete Collection Tales and Poems
Author: Edgar Allen Poe


.10.

Title: Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark
Author: Alvin Schwartz
Genre:   Children’s

Folklorist Alvin Schwartz offers up some of the most alarming tales of horror, dark revenge, and supernatural events of all time.

I’m an adult and still think of these stories around Halloween time!


Bonus:

Title: It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown
Author: Charles M. Schulz (illustrated by Scott Jeralds)
Genre:  Children’s


See other people’s lists here!

Thanks for reading, tell me what was on your list or link it below so I can check it out!

Top 10 Tuesday (11)

“Top Ten Tuesday” is hosted by The Broke and the Bookish.
Every week they pick a topic for us to do a top 10 list for and this week’s topic is…

This is my first Top 10 post since May! If you missed why I’ve been absent, see my post here. I’m really excited to be able to start posting again though, so here we go! I chose this top 10 (it was actually kind of a freebie) because the following books are what I think help shaped the things I am passionate about today. These are my pick of books I read from Middle School through College that taught me what I love (and don’t) about reading. 

“Chanda Reads Books” is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. This is at no cost to the readers of this blog.


.1.

Title: The Giver
Author: Lois Lowry
Genre: Sci-Fi, Dystopia, YA/Children’s fiction

The Giver was the first dystopian novel I had ever read, and I was hooked. I recently bought the quartet but I haven’t gotten a chance to read the other three yet.  


.2.

Title: Fahrenheit 451
Author: Ray Bradbury
Genre: Sci-Fi, Dystopia

The thought of a future where books would be banned and burned was horrifying to me as a young girl. I think I hoarded books for years after this because of my irrational (maybe not irrational) fear of losing the ability to read books. 


.3.

Title: 1984
Author: George Orwell
Genre: Sci-Fi, Dystopia

I am actually re-reading this book now via audio-book. Orwell paints such a vivid and stark world that I love diving into. 


.4.

Title:  The Handmaid’s Tale
Author:Margaret Atwood
Genre: Sci-Fi, Dystopia

As much as I enjoyed this book, I am actually enjoying the show on Hulu even more! The book itself got kind of tedious to me sometimes, but it’s on this list because it was my first taste in a world where women held less value than men. I was raised by a single dad who never forced traditional gender roles onto me because he simply didn’t have the luxury. He did all the cooking, cleaning, yard work, work on our cars, etc. He raised me to be a strong and independent woman who rarely took “no” for an answer, so The Handmaid’s Tale was shocking for my young and naive mind.  


.5.

Title:  The Hobbit
Author: J.R.R. Tolkien
Genre: Fantasy

My 5th grade teacher handed me this book with the warning that “it might be too much for me to understand”. I took that as a challenge and devoured this book. It was my first fantasy novel and propelled me into the fantasy genre which I still enjoy today. 


.6.

Title:  The Diary of a Young Girl
Author: Anne Frank
Genre: Non-Fiction, Historical, Memoirs

I remember being in high school and sobbing in my room after making it through this. I love learning about the Holocaust and reading about the terrors so many people had to endure, and am hoping someday to be able to visit the concentration camps and pay my respects in person. This book helped to teach me empathy and the resilience of humans. 


.7.

Title:  The Art of War
Author: Sun Tzu
Genre: Non-Fiction, History, Military

This is a really short book and I recommend it to everyone. The Art of War is more than a strategic guide for War, but it is a philosophical guide to life. 


Okay, these last three books are a little different. I loathed being forced to read all three of these books and as a result steer away from both contemporary and historical fiction novels because of it. Get your pitchforks ready because I’m about to make a few people upset ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ #sorrynotsorry

.8.

Title:  The Great Gatsby
Author: F. Scott Fitzgerald
Genre: Literary Fiction


.9.

Title:  Pride and Prejudice
Author: Jane Austen
Genre: Literary Fiction


.10.

Title:  The Scarlet Letter
Author: Nathaniel Hawthorne
Genre: Literary Fiction


Honorable Mentions: Books I never read in school but everyone else did.

I have no idea how I passed over these books, but they never came up in my curriculum. Maybe eventually I will go back to read them. 


See other people’s lists here!

The Glitch by Ramona Finn- Audiobook Tour

 Hey everyone!

I have decided to start participating in book review tours so you will see several of them pop up on my blog this month! There is a giveaway for this tour located at the bottom of the page 😉 I hope you enjoy!

Title: The Glitch
Author: Ramona Finn
Genre: YA, Dystopian, Sci-Fi
Format: Audio
Narrator: Genevieve Kaplan
Description
(Source: Amazon):

The Glitch (The Glitches, #1)On the brink of extinction, being human means more than just surviving. 

In Lib’s world, it’s dangerous to deviate from the norm. In fact, for someone who doesn’t live up to the Artificial Intelligence’s standards, it’s practically a death sentence. Lib learns this the hard way when she wakes up in a barren wasteland, with her memories erased, and only one thought lodged in her mind:

“It’s all my fault.”

Lib is a Glitch—an imperfect human component of the utopian world called the Norm. Now she’s thrown out, Lib will be forced to team up with another Glitch, Raj, and the mysterious Rogue Wolf and his clan to survive. Wolf only cares about the survival of his group, but Raj thinks they can hack the A.I. and change the Norm for the better.

Now, Lib will have to decide which path to choose—whether to go with striking loner Raj or stay with Wolf and his tight-knit group. Her heart is drawn to both, but she’s carrying a deadly secret that could jeopardize them all. Will she be able to save her newfound family and stop the A.I. before it’s too late? “


Review of the story:

The Glitch starts off by immediately throwing readers into a whirlwind of action. Our female protagonist (Lib) wakes up in a desert and remembers nothing- and I mean, nothing. Not her name, age, what she looks like, or even basic words at first. Over the course of the book Lib starts to have fleeting memories about who she may have been and her “purpose”, but it’s not until the end where we start to get big answers. 

After Lib wakes up she notices another girl in trouble and instinctively saves her life. The girl (Skye)  brings Lib to a group of people surviving outside the “Norm” (where Lib learns she was cast out from). The group of people is called a Clan and is comprised of Glitches like Lib, and Rouges – people born outside the Norm. It take a little bit longer than I would have liked to get an explanation to what a Glitch actually is, and this starts to enter spoiler territory so I won’t go into it too much. I can say however, that Glitches are people who used to live inside the norm but were tossed out due to the AI who runs the norm deeming them as malfunctioned. 

As the story progresses we see Lib struggle to gain the trust of her newfound friends and start to uncover truths about the Norm, the AI, herself, and the world. There is a little romance, but it definitely doesn’t overpower the main story-line.

The Clan reminds me of the Grounders from the show The 100. The harsh language, the lack of technology, and the reliance on folk-like traditions showed similarities to that group. If you like that aspect of the show, I think you will love the world that Finn has built outside of the Norm. 

My only complaint about the book is the lack of character development. I am very much a plot driven type of reader, so the action in this book was appealing to me. I do think however, it could have been slowed down a little for more character development. This would have allowed for more emotional connection not just to the protagonist, but also to the supporting characters that die throughout the book. 

Review of the audio:

Genevieve Kaplan does an okay job at narrating the book. There were times where I felt like she rushed the words and I thought I was listening at 1.25x speed, but she would usually even herself back out within a few minutes.  Her character voices were distinctive and I never had a hard time trying to decipher who was speaking. 

Rating:

    

Final Thoughts:
– Overall, the book was pretty good and I would recommend it to anyone interested in dystopian sci-fi. I will continue the series to see what happens to the group. 
– If you have Kindle Unlimited, It’s included in the program! If not, I highly suggest you get it. I can’t tell you how many great books I have found through Unlimited. Click below to join!

I received this audiobook as part of my participation in a blog tour with Audiobookworm Promotions. The tour is being sponsored by Ramona Finn. The gifting of this audiobook did not affect my opinion of it.


 

The Glitch Audio Blog Tour Giveaway


May 7: Dab of Darkness

May 8: Chapter Break

May 9: Chanda Reads

May 10: The Book Addict’s Reviews

May 11: The Page Unbound

May 12: SMADA’s Book Smack

May 13: Haddie’s Haven

May 14: terriluvsbooks

May 15: The Cinnamon Hollow

May 16: Lomeraniel

ABW Promos3

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Gilded Cage by Vic James

Title: Gilded Cage
Author: Vic Hames
Genre: YA, Fantasy, Dystopian
Format: Paperback ARC provided by Del Rey books
Description (Source: Amazon):

NOT ALL ARE FREE.
NOT ALL ARE EQUAL.
NOT ALL WILL BE SAVED.

Our world belongs to the Equals—aristocrats with magical gifts—and all commoners must serve them for ten years.

But behind the gates of England’s grandest estate lies a power that could break the world.

A girl thirsts for love and knowledge.

Abi is a servant to England’s most powerful family, but her spirit is free. So when she falls for one of their noble-born sons, Abi faces a terrible choice. Uncovering the family’s secrets might win her liberty—but will her heart pay the price?

A boy dreams of revolution.

Abi’s brother, Luke, is enslaved in a brutal factory town. Far from his family and cruelly oppressed, he makes friends whose ideals could cost him everything. Now Luke has discovered there may be a power even greater than magic: revolution.

And an aristocrat will remake the world with his dark gifts.

He is a shadow in the glittering world of the Equals, with mysterious powers no one else understands. But will he liberate—or destroy?”

Overall Assessment:
Gilded Cage is set in a modern, but alternate, England. There are two types of people in the world: Equals and commoners. Equals possess powers called “Skill” that are passed through bloodlines. Commoners are the poor souls with no Skill. In England, commoners must serve 10 years of their life as a slave, but they get to choose when it is as long as it’s between the age of 18 (or younger with parental consent) and 55. Most slaves are sent to factory towns in which they work in abhorrent conditions, are underfed, and are at mercy to “security” guards who abuse their power. A lucky (or not so lucky, depending who you ask) few are sent to estates to be house slaves for Equals.

We begin the story by meeting the unfortunate Leah, a house slave for the most prominent family in England. The story then quickly shifts to the Hadley family, with whom the majority of the story surrounds. The book had 7 different POVs, which at some points got to be a little irritating, but allows the reader to have insight into some of the other characters’ actions.

 

Rating:

   

What I liked:
– The complexity of the characters, there are very few “all bad” or “all good” characters. I found myself rooting for Gavar, just a little. I’m kind of hoping his character goes through a change in the next book or two. We see that he has a soft side, maybe Daisy can bring that out more. 
– While the changing POVs did get distracting at some points, overall I liked it. As I’ve said before, I don’t like being in the dark left to wonder about a character’s intentions. There is still enough of this to make it interesting and allow a major reveal at about 88% of the book, but not so much where the reader is left unsatisfied and wondering. 
– The story was an intriguing idea, as you see a world still divided by slavery. In the US it is divided by the “Union States of America” (non-slave lands)  and “Confederate States” (Slave lands). England is run by the Chancellor, who is of course an Equal. The world building was thoughtful and thorough.
– This was a pretty quick read. It felt jumpy at times due to the shifting POVs, but was filled with enough action that the story moved forward with ease for the most part.


What I didn’t:
–  I had a hard time connecting with Luke’s story until about 1/2 way through the book. I found myself skimming through some of his beginning chapters. This was an issue because Luke’s POV makes up about 49% of the book. If you’re wondering, the next closest is his sister Abi at 29%. The rest of the POVs only account for 1 or 2 chapters each. —I’ve given myself away a little here. I’m a data analyst IRL, so sorry about the stats, lol. 

Final Thoughts:
– I’m interested in continuing on with the series, but I’m hoping for more of Abi’s POV, and maybe even Daisy or Jenner’s as well. 
– It ended on a cliffhanger, so I would avoid this book if you don’t like them!

Links to purchase book:

Kindle               Hardcover                     Audible


First Line Fridays (1)

TGIF! I’ve got a long weekend ahead of me so I’m feeling especially festive for Friday this week. Today is my first First Line Fridays post hosted by Wandering Words.

Here are the rules (as outline by Wandering Words):

  • Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first page
  • Copy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader first
  • Finally… reveal the book!

“The children were playing while Holston climbed to his death; he could hear them squealing as only happy children do. While they thundered about frantically above, Holston took his time, each step methodical and ponderous, as he wound his way around and around the spiral staircase, old boots ringing out on metal treads. “


Scroll down for more info about the book.

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‘The Gathering’ by K.E.Ganshert

Title: The Gathering

Author: K.E. Ganshert

Genre: YA, Dystopian, Spirituality, Supernatural

Format: Audio

Narrator: Heather Masters

As a reminder, I review sequels a little different than other reviews. I am going to hide the description from the main page so you will have to click “Continue Reading” due to potential spoilers from previous books in the description or my review. 

Rating:

 

‘The Awakening’ by K.E. Ganshert

Title: The Awakening

Author: K.E. Ganshert

Genre: YA, Dystopian, Spirituality, Supernatural

Format: Audio

Narrators: Heather Masters

I will be doing sequels a little different than other reviews. I am going to hide the description from the main page so you will have to click “Continue Reading” due to potential spoilers from previous books in the description or my review. 

the-awakening

Rating:

 

‘Mordacious’ by Sarah Lyons Fleming

Title: Mordacious

Author: Sarah Lyons Fleming

Genre: Zombies, Sci-Fi, Dystopian

Format: eBook and Audio

Narrators: Luke Daniels, Therese Plummer

Description (Source: GoodReads):

Sylvie Rossi has the loner thing down pat, with the exception of her best friend, Grace. But when the two are trapped in a hospital during the last gasp of a dying city, alone time is no longer an option. A nurse’s offer of sanctuary promises Sylvie the supplies she needs to survive the zombie apocalypse–it’s the coexisting with people that might do her in. Eric Forrest will do whatever it takes to get into the dead city for his sister, including ending up dead himself. He’s used to taking risks, but with every mile he travels death looks likelier and likelier, and finding his sister may be his only prospect for survival—if he can make it home. Sylvie doesn’t need more than food, water and shelter. Eric wants only to find his sister. But sometimes what we think we need isn’t what we need at all, and what we find is more than we expected.

mordacious

Overall Assessment:
FINALLY! I have been waiting for this book since Sarah Lyons Fleming announced it after releasing the last book in her last series (Until the End of the World, book/series review here). The City Series will be on the same timeline as UTEOTW.

giphy-1

Of course, it did not disappoint! I have been waiting to hear what happened to Maria (Penny and Ana’s mom from UTEOTW) and Eric (Cassie’s brother). I am so glad we finally get some answers! I’m so excited to see what she will do with Sylvie, Eric, and co. !

Rating:

 

‘The Gifting’ by K.E. Ganshert

Title: The Gifting

Author: K.E. Ganshert

Genre: YA, Dystopian, Spirituality, Supernatural

Format: Audio

Narrator: Heather Matthews

Description (Source: GoodReads):

“If science is right, then I am crazy. And crazy is dangerous.”

In a world where nothing supernatural exists, Tess Eckhart is positive she’s going crazy. After her complete freak-out at a high school party, her family is too. So much that they pack their bags and move across the country, next to a nationally-renowned facility for the mentally ill.

Tess is determined to fit in at her new school, despite the whispers and stares. But when it comes to Luka Williams, a reluctantly popular boy in her class, she’s unused to a stare that intense. Then the headaches start, and the seemingly prophetic dreams that haunt her at night. As Tess tries harder to hide them, she becomes increasingly convinced that Luka knows something—that he might somehow be responsible.

But what if she’s wrong? What if Luka Williams is the only thing separating her from a madness too terrifying to fathom?

Overall Assessment: 
This book really interested me because of the spin it takes on religion. Ganshert created a world that had completely eradicated religion and the supernatural and turned to only science and logic instead. With this, the government was able to begin mandated abortions (or ‘curing’ the pregnant women of ‘defective’ fetuses, as told by the government), take away all guns held by private citizens, and put any person suffering from mental illness into institutions-involuntarily.

Rating: